First World War – Artefact Research

100 years on, why is Anzac Day still such an emotive and important day for New Zealanders?
What effect did the war have on New Zealanders on the front and at home?
Why was the First World War called the “war to end all wars”?
How do museums deal with precious artefacts and record their stories?


Suitable for: Y4-8   |   Cost: $3 per student   |   Maximum 4 classes per day

New Zealand Curriculum Alignment
Key Competencies – Thinking; Using language, symbols, and texts; Participating and contributing
Learning Areas – Social Sciences: L.2, L.3, L.4   |   English: L.2, L.3, L.4


 

This programme aims to help students gain a deeper understanding of the First World War and what it was like for New Zealanders on the front and at home.  Through our First World War artefact collection, students will explore how the life of every New Zealander was effected by the war.

From the men at war, the nurses who cared for them, the families left behind, the men unable to go to war, and those who refused to fight, all of New Zealand felt the burden of the war.

Students will have the opportunity to don white gloves and get hands on with history, examining First World War artefacts. Our artefact handling collection is made up of items which show how people reacted to the burdens and pressures of war, and illustrate the everyday lives of those living through the war.  We will use these artefacts to look at how to ask good investigative questions that lead to informative answers.  Students will have have access to research materials to form a collection card for the artefact they are investigating.  The groups within your class can then use their collection card to share the knowledge they have learnt back at school.

In combination with the artefact handling session, groups also have the option to take part in a poppy making session,* taking inspiration from the original French design. Students will learn the background of the poppy movement and why they are worn around Anzac Day, why they are so much more than a fashion accessory.  This session comes at an additional cost of $2 per student.

*Poppy sessions available from March to May

NZ Curriculum Alignment:

  • Social Sciences: Understand that:
    • L.2 – People have social, cultural, and economic roles, rights, and responsibilities; People makes choices to meet their needs and wants; Time and change affect people’s lives; People make a significant contributions to New Zealand’s society
    • L.3 – Groups make and implement rules and laws; People remember and record the past in different ways
    • L.4 – The ways in which leadership of groups is acquired and exercised have consequences for communities; People pass on and sustain culture and heritage for different reasons and that this has consequences for people; Events have causes and effects; Formal and informal groups make decisions that impact on communities; People participate individually and collectively in response to community challenges
  • English:
    • L.2 – Listening, Reading, and Viewing: Processes and strategies; Purposes and audiences; Ideas | Speaking, Writing, and Presenting: Processes and strategies; Purposes and audiences; Language features; Structure
    • L.3 – Listening, Reading, and Viewing: Processes and strategies; Purposes and audiences; Ideas | Speaking, Writing, and Presenting: Processes and strategies; Purposes and audiences; Ideas; Language features
    • L.4 – Listening, Reading, and Viewing: Processes and strategies; Purposes and audiences; Ideas | Speaking, Writing, and Presenting: Processes and strategies; Purposes and audiences; Ideas; Language features

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