France and Germany Star

The France and Germany Star was awarded for service in France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany between 6 June 1944 and 8 May 1945.  Its ribbon has five equal stripes of red, white and blue, the colours of the flags of Britain, France and the Netherlands.

 

One of the ironies of D-Day is that the medal struck for the campaign which started on the beaches of Normandy, was not in itself, received by the majority of naval personnel who participated.  The France and Germany Star was the last of the eight campaign stars personally designed by His Majesty the King for service in the various theatres of war during 1939-1945.

The first of these was the 1939 – 1945 Star, followed by the Atlantic Star, with others for service in North Africa, Italy, Air Operations over Europe, Burma and the Pacific.  Naval personnel servicing at sea, until very late in the war, had to qualify first for the 1939 – 1945 Star (six months) and then usually the Atlantic Star (another six months).  Therein lays the conundrum.  Not all of the stars were awarded, the maximum number being five.  For those earned in adjacent theatres, such as the Atlantic and France and Germany, a clasp was awarded.  Thus Naval personnel who had already qualified for the Atlantic Star received the clasp “France and Germany” to be worn on the ribbon of that medal, instead of the actual France and Germany Star.  When only ribbons are worn, a silver rosette on the ribbon of the Atlantic Star indicates the clasp.

The France and Germany Star was awarded for service in France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany between 6 June 1944 and 8 May 1945.  Its ribbon has five equal stripes of red, white and blue, the colours of the flags of Britain, France and the Netherlands.